Is Mobile Video Advertising the Answer?

Is Mobile Video Advertising the Answer?

With recent data showing that millennials will make up 25% of the U.S car market in 2015, you can expect to see many car companies targeting ads to this audience. But millennials don’t like traditional ads. This younger crowd is watching less TV and opting instead to view their entertainment on a mobile device, the majority of which are viewing on a small screen, such as a cell phone. They consume content on these platforms in relatively short bursts of time (under ten minutes). This, combined with the fact that traditional advertisements aren’t resonating with millennials, can leave one wondering what the best way to reach this audience is. Enter mobile video advertising. Mobile video accounted for the majority (55%) of mobile data traffic at the end of 2014. It is predicted that by 2019, it will grow to a staggering 75% of all content on mobile devices. And if any further evidence is needed to show the importance of mobile video, look at Facebook’s recent earnings report. Of the fourth quarter ad revenue, which was almost $3.6 billion, a whopping 70% was from mobile. If you haven’t leveraged mobile video advertising, now’s the time to...

More Reasons To Leave Traditional Advertising In The Rearview Mirror

With automotive sales rising and a successful North American International Auto Show recently wrapping up in Detroit, it seems that the automotive industry is back on the upward trend after some rocky years.  This seems even more solidified by a recent AutoTrader study showing that a majority of new cars are being purchased out of want, not need. This, along with about 61% of people stating that they research first and then set their budget, show that people are not as cash-strapped as they have been in previous years. Coupled with the fact that around 75% said they do not have a specific make or model in mind when they first start the process, presents the perfect opportunity for dealers to influence a buyer in the early stages. Auto Dealers are already aware of the importance of digital advertising. Out of the Detroit automakers, only Fiat Chrysler made an appearance during the Superbowl (Chevrolet’s ad ran minutes BEFORE the game). Most passed on the $4 million dollar price tag for a 30 second spot and focused on platforms such as social media and mobile advertising. After all, serving continuous ads, no matter what primetime television show is airing, might be more effective given how many people use a digital device. The continuous trend toward digital advertising and the reasons for the shift are definitely something to keep a watch on in...

Motor City Revival : 2015 Detroit Auto Show Highlights

The North American International Auto Show is being held at COBO Center in Detroit, Michigan from January 12 to the 25th. While the official press events have recently started, many interesting cars have already been shown. Ford’s new aluminum F-150 has taken the prize for Truck of the Year. Ford has taken a gamble with the new body that will shave 700 pounds off the weight of the truck, making it more fuel efficient by getting around 26 miles per gallon on the highway. This is a major step forward in complying with strict fuel efficiency standards that will require fuel economy be at 54.4 mpg by 2024. In a surprising turn of events, Volkswagen’s Golf has taken the Car of the Year award over Ford’s re-designed 2015 Mustang and the Hyundai Genesis. Some are not surprised, though, as the Golf has won numerous awards including Motor Trend’s Car of the Year. These awards come at a crucial time as Volkswagen is trying once again to build a market in the U.S after being unsuccessful for decades. Other cars of note are the Acura NSX, Toyota Tacoma, Mercedes GLE Coupe, and the Ford...

Shedding Light on Dark Social

A rarely discussed trend in social media sharing and tracking, Dark Social, has recently received some spotlight attention. Dark Social may sound ominous but it is actually very valuable to marketers. It refers to web traffic that, up until recently, hasn’t been able to be tracked by traditional web analytics software – this includes– links sent over email, messaging apps and some mobile applications. Wondering how this could affect your marketing efforts? For starters, dark social is larger, about three times larger by volume, than ordinary social media traffic. But it’s the quality, not necessarily the quantity, of dark social traffic that has everyone intrigued. By using dark social, advertisers can target ads much more effectively. For example, a friend sends you a link in an email recommending a new coffee machine. You check out the link but you don’t end up buying the machine. Normally, you would just be retargeted like everyone else. But, if the makers of the coffee machine could identify you as someone who came to the site via a recommendation from friend, you would be a more valuable lead. But how do you track something that has never been tracked before? Some vendors are adding tracking codes to URLs that are copied and pasted into a message. Instant messaging services are keen to come up with a solution since these messages are seen as the most intimate form of digital sharing. Some instant message platforms such as WhatsApp have included share buttons and have already seen a major impact. The future of dark social looks...

One-Click Car Shopping: The Future of Online Automotive Sales

Volvo has announced that it will be changing it’s marketing strategy to increasingly introduce selling cars online and focusing more on digital advertising. The automaker is hoping this will increase sales and promotion, while  capitalizing on the fact that about 80% of it’s customers already shop for products online. Will this trend eventually translate to buying cars online? A majority of millennials already do extensive research online before buying a car, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that marketers are predicting a rise in online car sales.  Current research shows that car buyers are visiting fewer and fewer dealerships, opting to search for the vehicle online and only visiting the dealer to purchase. While some dealers are skeptical about the future of online car sales, Volvo has assured that any sales made online would still go through dealerships. GMC introduced it’s Shop, Click, Drive program about a year ago. The program allows buyers to select their car and either pick it up at the dealership or have it delivered to their location of choice. Unsurprisingly, most people chose to visit the dealership. As it is, most online car shoppers choose their make, model, and specs and are directed to a dealer to finalize the sale, with a price often already decided on. As convenient as online auto shopping may sound, you still may not be getting the best deal. Dealers may continue to entice auto shoppers to visit the brick-and-mortar location with special price drops or extras that weren’t available online. The future of online car sales is undoubtedly worth a second thought – and we’re curious to see how dealerships...